Tag Archives: digital media

39 result(s)

Exploring How “Digital Families” Shape Children’s Learning

by Jason Yip
December 11, 2017

How did I become a researcher on children, families, and digital media? In September 2013, I started as a Cooney Center Research Fellow, trying to find my way in the world. I was just completing my Ph.D. at the University of Maryland, College Park and had done a dissertation on the … 







Building Together on 10 Years of Innovation and Research

by Catherine Jhee
December 6, 2017

Attention all designers, developers, and researchers: Almost 50 years ago, Joan Ganz Cooney submitted a proposal to the Carnegie Corporation that led to the creation of Sesame Street. Inspired by a conversation with Lloyd Morrisett about how children were so captivated by television that they were effortlessly learning advertising jingles, … 







A Mosaic of Insights Into Families’ Engagement with Digital Media

by Elisabeth Gee
November 28, 2017

Children and Families in the Digital Age: Learning Together in a Media Saturated Culture brings together insights from several years of work by a multidisciplinary team of scholars who comprise the Families and Media Project (FAM). As members of FAM as well as co-editors of the volume, we’re delighted to … 







Children and Families in the Digital Age: Learning Together in a Media Saturated Culture

by Administrator
November 20, 2017

We’re thrilled to announce the publication of Children and Families in the Digital Age: Learning Together in a Media Saturated Culture, edited by Elisabeth Gee,‎ Lori Takeuchi,‎ and Ellen Wartella. The book is based on research conducted by the Families and Media Project (FAM), a multi-disciplinary consortium comprised of researchers … 







No Such Thing: A New Podcast on Youth and Digital Learning

by Administrator
October 13, 2017

In his new podcast series, No Such Thing, host Marc Lesser surveys the current landscape of digital learning through lively interviews with students, practitioners, researchers, and more. To learn more about the show, we asked Marc to share how NST got its start—along with a few highlights from recent episodes.  Thanks … 







The App Fairy Podcast

by Administrator
May 23, 2017

The Joan Ganz Cooney Center is a proud to support the App Fairy, an original podcast featuring meet-the-author style interviews with top-quality children’s app makers. Created and hosted by children’s librarian Carissa Christner of the Madison Public Library, each App Fairy episode includes behind-the-scenes details about the app development process and research-based tips for using … 







A Checklist for Evaluating Diverse Children’s Media

by Claudia Haines
May 8, 2017

As a children’s librarian at a small library, a significant part of my job is to find and purchase the best books, audiobooks, puzzles, apps, websites, devices, and even toys for kids and teens ages 0-18. I’m also tasked with making sure families can find them in the library. Some … 







Five Tips for Reading E-Books with Young Children

by Katie Paciga and Mary Quest
March 27, 2017

This was originally published March 21, 2017 on the TEC Center blog and appears here with permission. Katie Paciga, a Fred Rogers Center and TEC Center Early Career Research Fellow, and Mary Quest, a doctoral student and instructor at Erikson Institute, recently published a study on e-book reading with young … 







Exploring Children’s Apps: A Course for Media Mentors

by Carissa Christner
November 29, 2016

Librarians are perfectly situated to become media mentors for families seeking help navigating the digital landscape, but not all librarians are comfortable in that realm themselves—yet. Perhaps you are (or know) a children’s librarian who would like to start using apps in the library, but you’re not sure how to … 







Combining Creativity and STEM Skills Through Video Game Design

by Jordan Shapiro
April 4, 2016

Almost every child in the United States plays video games—91% of children ages 2-17, according to NPD. But how many kids make their own video games? I could not find any reliable statistics. Nowadays, one barely needs to write a line of code in order to build a video game …