Tag Archives: meagan bromley

5 result(s)

Games for Change 2012: From Gamification to the Democratization of Games

by Meagan Bromley
July 2, 2012

A couple of weeks ago, I was lucky enough to hear from “one of the most influential women in technology,” the creators of “Zombie Yoga,” aNASA research scientist, the founder of Atari AND Chuck E. Cheese, a classroom teacher working in Hong Kong, the White House’s “video game czar” and a bunch of 12 … 







A Report from the Teaching with Technology Conference

by Meagan Bromley
March 4, 2012

On Friday, February 24th, the Center for Teaching Excellence at New York University hosted the Teaching with Technology Conference to promote conversations around how technology is currently being used in learning environments and how the field of education can develop the best possible relationship with technology across various disciplines and … 







Is the Gamepocalypse Upon Us? A Report From the Games for Change Festival

by Meagan Bromley
June 30, 2011

At Games for Change (G4C) last week, the audience was treated to a number of interesting discussions and keynotes surrounding current issues of video game play for learning and social change. Among the hot topics were of course the impending “Gamepocalypse” that will arguably come as a result of intense … 







50th Anniversary Celebration of Jerome Bruners The Process of Education

by Meagan Bromley
May 5, 2011

Last Wednesday, April 27th, New York University held a special event to celebrate the work of University Professor Jerome Bruner. This year marks the 50th anniversary of his landmark publication, The Process of Education. Panel discussions between leading researchers who worked with Bruner in the 1960s and notable authors and … 







World Read Aloud Day: Empowerment: Take a Look, It’s in a Book

by Meagan Bromley
March 2, 2011

Occasionally, those of us who work in digital media can get so caught up in the excitement of exploring the “new literacies” that make up our 21st century educational landscape, that it can be easy to lose sight of the fundamental problem of not being able to read. The truth …